September 2017 | Curtis Parkinson

0115 964 7740 - law@curtisparkinson.com

Coronavirus – COVID-19: Whilst our offices remain closed, all our staff are working and our telephones are fully operational. We’re also offering meetings via video for advice on Wills, Lasting Power of Attorney or Probate and 'Drive In' appointments for Notorial services. As ever, please contact us if you have any queries. More >>

Challenging Wills - How To Mitigate, Curtis Parkinson

Challenging Wills – How To Mitigate The Challenge

Following on from our previous article on the successful challenge, we now set out how the mother could have done things differently to ensure her wishes were respected. There is nothing that you can do to prevent a challenge to your Will or gifts made in life, but you can make it harder with correct…

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New Pre-action Protocol For Debt Claims

The Pre-action Protocol for debt claims comes into force on Sunday 1 October 2017 and will potentially have a severe impact on a business if it has outstanding debts due from individuals and sole traders because of the delays that are built into this protocol. The Protocol applies to any creditor business (in limited form,…

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3 Different Ways Of Marketing & Selling Your Property

When it comes to selling a house there are quite a few things to consider. Near the top of the list is how best to market probably your most valuable asset. Traditionally, the first instinct would more than likely be to get in touch with an estate agent or auctioneer depending on the type of…

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Challenging Wills – Reasonable Provision / Maintenance

Challenging Wills Challenging wills and contentious probate is a growing area. Recently an estranged daughter successfully contested her late mother’s Will for lack of maintenance provision against three charities. I will now provide my opinion on the case and how the mother could have ensured her testamentary wishes were respected.  This article will be in…

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Joint Accounts – What if the joint holder becomes mentally incapable?

You would assume that if one account holder loses capacity that the other can carry on using the account – yes? No – in England and Wales, banks and building societies have a discretion to freeze or restrict the operation of the account to essential transactions (i.e. bills, care fees and living expenses). If the…

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